Monthly Archives: July 2010

ProQuest

Proquest will be launching the all-new ProQuest platform this year:

A better way to search, find, use, and share information.

The all-new ProQuest platform makes life easier … whether you are:

  • Needing to find information within a database in a specific subject area or across databases that your library subscribes to from ProQuest
  • Searching for full-image content in context from a wide range of formats
  • Browsing abstracts to explore topics for papers
  • Citing findings for bibliographies
  • Saving searches
  • Sharing results with other users
  • Looking for research to be quick and fun

The all-new ProQuest platform provides a holistic view of complementary content types and formats, including leading journals, periodicals, news content, rare and archival information, dissertations, research reports, e-books, and multimedia—within and across subject areas.

Discover more, from browsing to serious research.

With the all-new ProQuest platform you can:

  • Browse within and across databases that your library subscribes to from ProQuest
  • Research topics for papers
  • Select specific databases or cross-search databases across subject areas for comparative studies that your library subscribes to from ProQuest
  • Find full-text-articles and scholarly resources with links to similar materials
  • Search specific document types—including primary sources, peer-reviewed journals, dissertations, images, graphs, and tables
  • Create a bibliography for a paper
  • Cite, customize, manage, and share results via email and social networking links
  • Set up alerts and RSS feeds to stay up to date with developments in the field
  • Search for research grant opportunities with COS Funding Opportunities™
  • Set up a profile in COS Scholar Universe™—with direct access to millions of authors, faculty, and researchers working in a range of disciplines worldwide

The all-new ProQuest platform is coming soon.

The first release will provide access to the following databases:

  • All of the databases on the ProQuest platform 
  • All of the databases on the CSA Illumina platform 
  • Chadwyck-Healey products: British Periodicals, International Index to Music Periodicals (IIMP), International Index to the Performing Arts (IIPA), and PRISMA (Publicaciones y Revistas Sociales y Humanísticas

Libraries that are currently ProQuest customers will be notified when their library will have access to the new platform.

So be sure to keep an eye out for the all-new ProQuest platform at your library!

What to do if the full-text link fails?

Although we’re always working hard in the background to try and ensure you can get easy, simple and quick access to the full-text of journal articles via Summon, we can’t guarantee it will work all of the time — with access to over 34 million articles, it would take library staff years* to check them all.

If you click on a link and you’re not able to get the full-text, there are a couple of things you can do…

1. Check to see if you can access the full-text from somewhere else

If you’ve clicked on a result in Summon, you might see something like this if the link to the full-text isn’t working:

At the top of the page, check to see if it says No full-text? Look for more sources or report a problem. If it does, click on the more sources link:

The “Article Linker” page should appear and you can check to see if the full-text is available elsewhere — in this particular case, the article is also available on two other sites:

2. Let us know so we can fix the problem

Since we have access to so many journal articles, we don’t always know when something isn’t working properly. It only takes a few seconds to report a problem and we’ll endeavour to fix the issue as quickly as possible.

On every “Article Linker” page you’ll find a “report a problem” link in the “Need Help?” section. Just click on that link, add a short description of the problem (e.g. “full text doesn’t work”) and then click submit:

Don’t forgot to include your email address is you’d like a reply!


* if we checked 1 article every second for 12 hours a day, it would take well over 2 years to check them all :-S